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QUEEN – I Want To Break Free

Queen: “We had done some really serious, epic videos in the past, and we just thought we’d have some fun. We wanted people to know that we didn’t take ourselves too seriously, that we could still laugh at ourselves. I think we proved that.”

queen-i-want-to-break-free

Queen – I Want To Break Free

I want to break free
I want to break free
I want to break free from your lies
You’re so self satisfied I don’t need you
I’ve got to break free
God knows, God knows I want to break free.

I’ve fallen in love
I’ve fallen in love for the first time

And this time I know it’s for real
I’ve fallen in love, yeah
God knows, God knows I’ve fallen in love.

It’s strange but it’s true
I can’t get over the way you love me like you do
But I have to be sure
When I walk out that door
Oh how I want to be free, baby
Oh how I want to be free,
Oh how I want to break free.

But life still goes on
I can’t get used to, living without, living without,
Living without you by my side
I don’t want to live alone, hey
God knows, got to make it on my own
So baby can’t you see
I’ve got to break free.

I’ve got to break free
I want to break free, yeah
I want, I want, I want, I want to break free.



Wiki:

“I Want to Break Free” is a song by British rock band Queen, from their eleventh studio album The Works (1984). Written by bassist John Deacon, it was distributed as a single on 7-inch and 12-inch vinyl records and 3-inch and 5-inch CDs. The song had three versions: album, single and extended, differing in length by more than a factor of 2. It came to be included in most live concerts by the group, in several videos, and in The Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert where it was sung by Lisa Stansfield.

The song is largely known for its music video for which all the band members dressed in women’s clothes, a concept proposed by Roger Taylor, which parodied the long-running ITV soap opera Coronation Street. The second part of the video included a composition rehearsed and performed with the Royal Ballet and choreographed by Wayne Eagling. Whereas the parody was acclaimed in the United Kingdom, it was considered controversial in the United States and banned by MTV and other stations. After its release in 1984 the single of the song was well received all over Europe and South America, where it was listed within top ten and regarded as an anthem of fight against oppression. The single reached only the 45th position in the US charts, but reached number 3 in the UK and was certified silver with 200,000+ copies sold…

Source: Wikipedia

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Written by Dario

My name is Dario, I’m 44 years young and I live in Croatia (at the moment). I’m not a writer, so please don’t expect any kind of up level stories or posts from me! 😉 I’m just trying to do my best to put a smile on everyone’s face whenever it’s possible.

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